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New ONE Z Electric Unicycle from Ninebot by Segway

After two years of waiting, the leading electric mono wheel manufacturer, NINEBOT (the owner of the SEGWAY brand and technology) introduced a new electric unicycle on August 12, 2017 and is again a revolutionary novelty. The NINEBOT ONE Z will be sold in three versions of Z6, 8 and 10, which will vary with engine power, battery capacity and speed. All machines are equipped with 18″ and full lighting. More detailed specifications in the table below.

 

 

£TBC

    Z6

    Max Speed: 35km

    Battery: 574wh

    Motor: 1200w

    Range: 40-55km

    Max Load: 150kg

    Max incline: 20 degrees

£TBC

    Z8

    Max Speed: 40km

    Battery: 862wh

    Motor: 1500w

    Range: 60-80km

    Max Load: 150kg

    Max incline: 25 degrees

£TBC

    Z10

    Max Speed: 45km

    Battery: 1000wh

    Motor: 1800w

    Range: 80-100km

    Max Load: 150kg

    Max incline: 25 degrees

Official advert from the new ONE Z model from Ninebot by Segway. Many specs and things to confirm still but we can wait to try this beast out. We will keep you all updated.

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Battery Capacity – Wheel Buying Guide

Overall, an electric micro-mobility device consumes 10Wh per km at 20 ° C on flat and smooth ground without wind, at a constant speed, with a user of 75kg and a tire inflated to the recommended pressure (firm tire).

The amount of energy contained in your battery is expressed as Wh. Some will tell you about Ah for Ampere-hour. Simply multiply the Ah by the Volts V (the battery voltage) to get the Wh.

Under the conditions described above, a battery of 200Wh will generally offer 20km (12.5 miles) of autonomy, while a battery of 850Wh will theoretically offer 85km (53 miles) of autonomy. A more capacitive battery may seem ideal, but be aware of the following:

  • A more capacitive battery recharges less often, and thus lasts longer
  • A more capacitive battery is longer to recharge (downside…)
  • A more capacitive battery increases the weight of the vehicle
  • The North and South Circular Roads together form the second ring road around London, averaging 10–15 miles (16–24 km) in diameter., so it will be necessary to analyze your daily journeys

A question often comes up: is it better to start with an electric wheel of 340Wh or 680Wh? We advise 680Wh, especially to enjoy the power much longer.

  • A 340Wh electric monowheel offers approximately 20km (12.5 miles) of range if you start driving in a sporty way, meaning that the last 10 km will be limited (the wheel will decrease in speed and acceleration, notifying you by premature beeps) The battery will have decreased in voltage and current intensity deliverable after the first 10 km.
  • A 680Wh electric single-wheel offers about 40km of range if you start driving in sporty driving, which means that the last 10 km will be quieter because your instantly deliverable current is initially doubled: 680Wh batteries are composed Of 2 packs of 340Wh mounted in parallel, which doubles the amperage deliverable when the battery is 100%. After 50% of battery consumption, you will still have the same amperage as a 340Wh. After 75% battery consumption, you will have dropped amperage and will have to slow down.
  • Moreover, 680Wh recharges 3 times less often and therefore undergoes 3 times less the effect of the 1000 cycles of maximum life.

The capacities widespread to date are the following: 260Wh, 340Wh, 520Wh, 680Wh, 840Wh up to 1600Wh

Be careful, however, the delivered power drops when the battery empties. On the electric wheel, stabilization becomes less strong or less reactive. It is for this reason that we advise to accelerate smoothly once passed below the 50% charge of the battery of the electric unicycle.

Don’t hesitate in contact us for more information or advice

 
 

Check our selection of  Electric Unicycles 

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After US Ninebot by Segway arrives to Europe

Segway, world leader in electric personal transport, opens a new European office in Amsterdam. With this office, Segway aims to better serve the European market with a comprehensive range of iconic business-to-business Segway products as well as new consumer products, under the brand Ninebot by Segway. The Segway Europe office was opened on June 21, 2016, in the presence of CEO Lufeng Gao.

The establishment of Segway Europe ensures availability of the full product line-up of both brands for the business-to-business as well as the consumer market. From the new office, Segway Europe can now serve these markets for the entire EU region, enabling professional distribution, central management and increased marketing activities. In the next few months two new mass market models will be launched – the Ninebot One S2 and Ninebot Mini Pro.

Dennis Hardholt is responsible for the introduction of Segway and Ninebot by Segway products in the EMEA region as the President of Segway Europe. “From our new European office we are able to serve all the European, Middle Eastern and African markets. We will immediately make a range of exciting new consumer products available that complement our existing line up. With these affordable models we will further open up the market for smart, green personal transportation. They will add a touch of fun and excitement to the daily lives of consumers, while answering to the practical need for short distance transportation and leisure activities.”

About Segway

Segway Europe has been founded by Ninebot Ltd. from Beijing, bringing together the brands Segway and Ninebot – both leading in electronic personal transportation. Both brands focus on research and development, design, manufacturing, sales and service in short-distance personal transportation, in order to increase the industry and to lead the revolution of mobile robotics solutions. Segway and Ninebot devote a great deal of attention to seamlessly connecting robotic solutions to smart phones and integrating existing technologies and future concepts, such as voice interaction and facial recognition with its robotic products – products that will be highly interactive and encourage smarter living. Segway Europe opened its first European office in Amsterdam in June 2016.

For more information, visit http://www.segway.com.

SOURCE Segway Europe

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EU Safety Standard for “The Segway Likes”

At the initiative of France, a voluntary standard will provide safety requirements for personal light electric vehicles (PLEV) in 2016. A framework dealing with their use will also be developed for these new modes of urban mobility; the Segway likes.

After e-bikes, now light electric vehicles (like electric step-scooters) and self-balancing vehicles (including single wheel transporters) are attracting the interest of consumers wanting to try such alternative modes of urban transport. These personal light electric vehicles are however put on the market without prior harmonized test methods based on shared methods. European Directives do indeed exist, but they don’t provide any specific requirements for these machines, nor do they prevent the sale of badly performing or even hazardous products.

Safety and performance guarantees

“Decathlon contacted us as early as 2013 to share this situation with us: the absence of any specific technical standard means that each manufacturer tests its products based on its own criteria,” explains Emmanuel Husson, head of this AFNOR standard development project and secretary of the European working group. “The safety and performance guarantees displayed are therefore of limited value. Decathlon has adopted a proactive approach by opting for standardization. It has agreed to share its test protocol as a basis for the work on the future European standard.”

Anticipating regulation

The safety standards development enables market players, in all their diversity, to adopt a self-regulation approach. With this voluntary standard, manufacturers are at the forefront of regulatory initiatives. Honda (via its Belgian subsidiary), Toyota (through its French presence), Egret (Germany), L-Trott (France) and Trikke (Netherlands) have properly understood this and are actively involved in the work. Representatives of public authorities (including the DGCCRF for France – Directorate General for Competition Policy, Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control) and consumers (ANEC) are also present. “These entities have very high safety requirements,” adds Emmanuel Husson.

Product safety and usage conditions

The future European standard will cover light electric vehicles without seats and self-balancing vehicles, with or without seats, intended primarily for the transportation of one person in the urban environment. This standard excludes applications coming under the health field (covered by EN ISO 13482).

A technical part will propose methods for testing the vehicle’s mechanical and electrical components. Tests on brakes, tires, battery, handlebar, the robustness of the footrest, etc. All aspects of the vehicle will be covered to ensure a minimum safety level and limit main hazards.

In and excluded

Regarding the use, the voluntary standard will exclude vehicles having a maximum speed of 25 km/h. Included are machines designed to be used in public as well as private spaces, for instance in airports, libraries or large organizations, etc. In public spaces, they are already permitted on cycle tracks and sidewalks at a maximum speed of 6 km/h. “Due to the permitted tolerance, members of the working group have anticipated a possible future regulation with the addition of a specific button to switch to pedestrian mode,” mentions Emmanuel Husson. He continues: “The vast majority of manufacturers already offer a speed regulation system that could be useful if future legislation imposes a speed limit to be respected.”

The future voluntary standard will be proposed in a public inquiry in the first quarter of 2016, prior to publication in the course of the year.

Source: Bike-eu.com

 

More information:

European Committee for Standardization 

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How hard is it to ride an Electric Unicycle?

Most people find it quite difficult to get their head around the mechanics of an electric unicycle. The forward-backward movement is not much of a problem, because the unicycle’s gyroscopes and sensors look after that extremely well and after using the stabilizers/learning wheels for a very short time, most people have absolutely no problem with it.

The big problem, though, is to learn to master the sideways balancing, because that is completely left to you and the unicycle will not help you with it. There has been another time in most people’s life when you had to learn the sideways balancing, but that was a loooong time ago when your body was learning faster and you were less afraid of falling: Learning to ride an electric unicycle is like learning to ride a bicycle again! But the good news is that you managed once before, so you will manage it again! Give yourself some time and check out the learning resources are providing in another section of this website and trust your abilities! It is definitely worth it!

Everybody who has normal balance and normal use of legs and arms can learn it and a generalized rule could be: If you can cycle a bicycle, you can also ride a unicycle.

The good thing about human beings is that everybody is a little different and everybody has some strengths and some weaknesses. That also means that there are fast learners and others need a bit more time. We also run classes for people that want to learn it and we have seen huge differences. Some people learn the basics within 5-10 minutes, other need days or even weeks. Be consistent and keep working on it, but also leave breaks! Our brain sometimes needs a little extra time to build new connections in the brain.

Like you mastered cycling, you will also eventually master riding an electric unicycle and once you can do it, you will never forget it again.

Do you want to try? Join us in our open training and testing days.