Posted on Leave a comment

Storing or using electric scooters during winter.

 

 

When the scooter is being used in winter, the battery must not get into contact with water, humidity, sand and / or salt (when the streets are sanded). The scooter needs to be cleaned with a soft piece of dry cloth after every ride. Low temperatures cause a reduced performance.

To make sure, your driving pleasure continues next spring, we have compiled an overview of what to keep in mind when storing or using scooters during winter. As with all battery-equipped devices, the battery requires a little attention to get through the cold time of the year.

  • When storing the scooter, it needs to be clean and dry– The storage location needs to be dry and neither too warm nor too cold – a temperature between 15 – 25 °C is ideal
  • When storing the scooter, the state of charge needs to be between 30% and 50%
  • Every three months latest, the scooter needs to be charged for approx. 30 minutes
  • In general, battery-equipped devices must be stored away from flammable materials

An incorrect storage or an extended period without charging the battery can cause an irreparable depth discharge. This is not a warranty case.

Following the winter break, the scooter is best handled like a new vehicle. Prior to the first ride, all security-relevant features need to be checked (brakes, lights, folding mechanisms, etc.). The battery needs to be fully charged and then once completely driven empty. It might happen that the state of charge is not correctly indicated – this will settle due to this procedure.

 

Posted on Leave a comment

Give your car a holiday, go personal, go electric

Walk, cycle, bus, tube, tram, boat, e-unicycle, e-scooters, e-bike… However you like to travel, leave your car at home and take to the streets. As well as cutting down the amount of pollution you make, you can get some exercise, check out that new deli you’ve been meaning to pop into, or even meet a friend for a catch-up on the way home.

 

What is air pollution made up from?

Air pollution comes from a range of sources, including some nearby, like vehicles, other sources throughout the city, and some further afield. The proportion of pollution that reaches us from each source depends on the weather, the location, the time of day, and a number of other factors. Wherever you are, you’ll breathe in some of this pollution.

The main pollutants are carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, ground level ozone, particulates, sulphur dioxide, hydrocarbons and lead. Each one comes from a different source, has different effects on our health, and different chemical behaviours, which is why it’s hard to understand and control air pollution.

 

How can I get warnings when there are periods of high pollution?

Air pollution forecasts and alerts are available for the whole of the UK from Defra.

Sign up to get daily pollution forecasts for London here or to just receive alerts on high pollution days click here.

You can also get warnings on your iPhone by subscribing to the ‘At-risk’ group in this app, which will help you plan the best route through London to minimise air pollution exposure.

 

There are also some easy ways to use your car less, like car-sharing or working from home one day a week. And they quickly become part of your routine. Just swap face-to-face meetings for video conferencing, and sitting on your own in traffic for chatting to your colleagues about what Steve in accounts has been up to recently. Plus you can have a lie-in, pick up the kids from school, go for an early meal… and make the air cleaner for everyone.

 

We at PET want to help make our cities better, smarter and healthier places to live, making urban commuting as efficient and fun as possible. Join in with #NationalCleanAirDay and act now to create a cleaner, healthier future for us all. Check our Light Electric Vehicles for Urban Transport

 

More Info about Clean Air please visit: www.cleanairday.org.uk

Posted on Leave a comment

Battery Capacity – Wheel Buying Guide

Overall, an electric micro-mobility device consumes 10Wh per km at 20 ° C on flat and smooth ground without wind, at a constant speed, with a user of 75kg and a tire inflated to the recommended pressure (firm tire).

The amount of energy contained in your battery is expressed as Wh. Some will tell you about Ah for Ampere-hour. Simply multiply the Ah by the Volts V (the battery voltage) to get the Wh.

Under the conditions described above, a battery of 200Wh will generally offer 20km (12.5 miles) of autonomy, while a battery of 850Wh will theoretically offer 85km (53 miles) of autonomy. A more capacitive battery may seem ideal, but be aware of the following:

  • A more capacitive battery recharges less often, and thus lasts longer
  • A more capacitive battery is longer to recharge (downside…)
  • A more capacitive battery increases the weight of the vehicle
  • The North and South Circular Roads together form the second ring road around London, averaging 10–15 miles (16–24 km) in diameter., so it will be necessary to analyze your daily journeys

A question often comes up: is it better to start with an electric wheel of 340Wh or 680Wh? We advise 680Wh, especially to enjoy the power much longer.

  • A 340Wh electric monowheel offers approximately 20km (12.5 miles) of range if you start driving in a sporty way, meaning that the last 10 km will be limited (the wheel will decrease in speed and acceleration, notifying you by premature beeps) The battery will have decreased in voltage and current intensity deliverable after the first 10 km.
  • A 680Wh electric single-wheel offers about 40km of range if you start driving in sporty driving, which means that the last 10 km will be quieter because your instantly deliverable current is initially doubled: 680Wh batteries are composed Of 2 packs of 340Wh mounted in parallel, which doubles the amperage deliverable when the battery is 100%. After 50% of battery consumption, you will still have the same amperage as a 340Wh. After 75% battery consumption, you will have dropped amperage and will have to slow down.
  • Moreover, 680Wh recharges 3 times less often and therefore undergoes 3 times less the effect of the 1000 cycles of maximum life.

The capacities widespread to date are the following: 260Wh, 340Wh, 520Wh, 680Wh, 840Wh up to 1600Wh

Be careful, however, the delivered power drops when the battery empties. On the electric wheel, stabilization becomes less strong or less reactive. It is for this reason that we advise to accelerate smoothly once passed below the 50% charge of the battery of the electric unicycle.

Don’t hesitate in contact us for more information or advice

 
 

Check our selection of  Electric Unicycles 

Posted on Leave a comment

EU Safety Standard for “The Segway Likes”

At the initiative of France, a voluntary standard will provide safety requirements for personal light electric vehicles (PLEV) in 2016. A framework dealing with their use will also be developed for these new modes of urban mobility; the Segway likes.

After e-bikes, now light electric vehicles (like electric step-scooters) and self-balancing vehicles (including single wheel transporters) are attracting the interest of consumers wanting to try such alternative modes of urban transport. These personal light electric vehicles are however put on the market without prior harmonized test methods based on shared methods. European Directives do indeed exist, but they don’t provide any specific requirements for these machines, nor do they prevent the sale of badly performing or even hazardous products.

Safety and performance guarantees

“Decathlon contacted us as early as 2013 to share this situation with us: the absence of any specific technical standard means that each manufacturer tests its products based on its own criteria,” explains Emmanuel Husson, head of this AFNOR standard development project and secretary of the European working group. “The safety and performance guarantees displayed are therefore of limited value. Decathlon has adopted a proactive approach by opting for standardization. It has agreed to share its test protocol as a basis for the work on the future European standard.”

Anticipating regulation

The safety standards development enables market players, in all their diversity, to adopt a self-regulation approach. With this voluntary standard, manufacturers are at the forefront of regulatory initiatives. Honda (via its Belgian subsidiary), Toyota (through its French presence), Egret (Germany), L-Trott (France) and Trikke (Netherlands) have properly understood this and are actively involved in the work. Representatives of public authorities (including the DGCCRF for France – Directorate General for Competition Policy, Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control) and consumers (ANEC) are also present. “These entities have very high safety requirements,” adds Emmanuel Husson.

Product safety and usage conditions

The future European standard will cover light electric vehicles without seats and self-balancing vehicles, with or without seats, intended primarily for the transportation of one person in the urban environment. This standard excludes applications coming under the health field (covered by EN ISO 13482).

A technical part will propose methods for testing the vehicle’s mechanical and electrical components. Tests on brakes, tires, battery, handlebar, the robustness of the footrest, etc. All aspects of the vehicle will be covered to ensure a minimum safety level and limit main hazards.

In and excluded

Regarding the use, the voluntary standard will exclude vehicles having a maximum speed of 25 km/h. Included are machines designed to be used in public as well as private spaces, for instance in airports, libraries or large organizations, etc. In public spaces, they are already permitted on cycle tracks and sidewalks at a maximum speed of 6 km/h. “Due to the permitted tolerance, members of the working group have anticipated a possible future regulation with the addition of a specific button to switch to pedestrian mode,” mentions Emmanuel Husson. He continues: “The vast majority of manufacturers already offer a speed regulation system that could be useful if future legislation imposes a speed limit to be respected.”

The future voluntary standard will be proposed in a public inquiry in the first quarter of 2016, prior to publication in the course of the year.

Source: Bike-eu.com

 

More information:

European Committee for Standardization 

Posted on Leave a comment

How hard is it to ride an Electric Unicycle?

Most people find it quite difficult to get their head around the mechanics of an electric unicycle. The forward-backward movement is not much of a problem, because the unicycle’s gyroscopes and sensors look after that extremely well and after using the stabilizers/learning wheels for a very short time, most people have absolutely no problem with it.

The big problem, though, is to learn to master the sideways balancing, because that is completely left to you and the unicycle will not help you with it. There has been another time in most people’s life when you had to learn the sideways balancing, but that was a loooong time ago when your body was learning faster and you were less afraid of falling: Learning to ride an electric unicycle is like learning to ride a bicycle again! But the good news is that you managed once before, so you will manage it again! Give yourself some time and check out the learning resources are providing in another section of this website and trust your abilities! It is definitely worth it!

Everybody who has normal balance and normal use of legs and arms can learn it and a generalized rule could be: If you can cycle a bicycle, you can also ride a unicycle.

The good thing about human beings is that everybody is a little different and everybody has some strengths and some weaknesses. That also means that there are fast learners and others need a bit more time. We also run classes for people that want to learn it and we have seen huge differences. Some people learn the basics within 5-10 minutes, other need days or even weeks. Be consistent and keep working on it, but also leave breaks! Our brain sometimes needs a little extra time to build new connections in the brain.

Like you mastered cycling, you will also eventually master riding an electric unicycle and once you can do it, you will never forget it again.

Do you want to try? Join us in our open training and testing days.