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New ONE Z Electric Unicycle from Ninebot by Segway

After two years of waiting, the leading electric mono wheel manufacturer, NINEBOT (the owner of the SEGWAY brand and technology) introduced a new electric unicycle on August 12, 2017 and is again a revolutionary novelty. The NINEBOT ONE Z will be sold in three versions of Z6, 8 and 10, which will vary with engine power, battery capacity and speed. All machines are equipped with 18″ and full lighting. More detailed specifications in the table below.

 

 

£TBC

    Z6

    Max Speed: 35km

    Battery: 574wh

    Motor: 1200w

    Range: 40-55km

    Max Load: 150kg

    Max incline: 20 degrees

£TBC

    Z8

    Max Speed: 40km

    Battery: 862wh

    Motor: 1500w

    Range: 60-80km

    Max Load: 150kg

    Max incline: 25 degrees

£TBC

    Z10

    Max Speed: 45km

    Battery: 1000wh

    Motor: 1800w

    Range: 80-100km

    Max Load: 150kg

    Max incline: 25 degrees

Official advert from the new ONE Z model from Ninebot by Segway. Many specs and things to confirm still but we can wait to try this beast out. We will keep you all updated.

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Battery Capacity – Wheel Buying Guide

Overall, an electric micro-mobility device consumes 10Wh per km at 20 ° C on flat and smooth ground without wind, at a constant speed, with a user of 75kg and a tire inflated to the recommended pressure (firm tire).

The amount of energy contained in your battery is expressed as Wh. Some will tell you about Ah for Ampere-hour. Simply multiply the Ah by the Volts V (the battery voltage) to get the Wh.

Under the conditions described above, a battery of 200Wh will generally offer 20km (12.5 miles) of autonomy, while a battery of 850Wh will theoretically offer 85km (53 miles) of autonomy. A more capacitive battery may seem ideal, but be aware of the following:

  • A more capacitive battery recharges less often, and thus lasts longer
  • A more capacitive battery is longer to recharge (downside…)
  • A more capacitive battery increases the weight of the vehicle
  • The North and South Circular Roads together form the second ring road around London, averaging 10–15 miles (16–24 km) in diameter., so it will be necessary to analyze your daily journeys

A question often comes up: is it better to start with an electric wheel of 340Wh or 680Wh? We advise 680Wh, especially to enjoy the power much longer.

  • A 340Wh electric monowheel offers approximately 20km (12.5 miles) of range if you start driving in a sporty way, meaning that the last 10 km will be limited (the wheel will decrease in speed and acceleration, notifying you by premature beeps) The battery will have decreased in voltage and current intensity deliverable after the first 10 km.
  • A 680Wh electric single-wheel offers about 40km of range if you start driving in sporty driving, which means that the last 10 km will be quieter because your instantly deliverable current is initially doubled: 680Wh batteries are composed Of 2 packs of 340Wh mounted in parallel, which doubles the amperage deliverable when the battery is 100%. After 50% of battery consumption, you will still have the same amperage as a 340Wh. After 75% battery consumption, you will have dropped amperage and will have to slow down.
  • Moreover, 680Wh recharges 3 times less often and therefore undergoes 3 times less the effect of the 1000 cycles of maximum life.

The capacities widespread to date are the following: 260Wh, 340Wh, 520Wh, 680Wh, 840Wh up to 1600Wh

Be careful, however, the delivered power drops when the battery empties. On the electric wheel, stabilization becomes less strong or less reactive. It is for this reason that we advise to accelerate smoothly once passed below the 50% charge of the battery of the electric unicycle.

Don’t hesitate in contact us for more information or advice

 
 

Check our selection of  Electric Unicycles 

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EU Safety Standard for “The Segway Likes”

At the initiative of France, a voluntary standard will provide safety requirements for personal light electric vehicles (PLEV) in 2016. A framework dealing with their use will also be developed for these new modes of urban mobility; the Segway likes.

After e-bikes, now light electric vehicles (like electric step-scooters) and self-balancing vehicles (including single wheel transporters) are attracting the interest of consumers wanting to try such alternative modes of urban transport. These personal light electric vehicles are however put on the market without prior harmonized test methods based on shared methods. European Directives do indeed exist, but they don’t provide any specific requirements for these machines, nor do they prevent the sale of badly performing or even hazardous products.

Safety and performance guarantees

“Decathlon contacted us as early as 2013 to share this situation with us: the absence of any specific technical standard means that each manufacturer tests its products based on its own criteria,” explains Emmanuel Husson, head of this AFNOR standard development project and secretary of the European working group. “The safety and performance guarantees displayed are therefore of limited value. Decathlon has adopted a proactive approach by opting for standardization. It has agreed to share its test protocol as a basis for the work on the future European standard.”

Anticipating regulation

The safety standards development enables market players, in all their diversity, to adopt a self-regulation approach. With this voluntary standard, manufacturers are at the forefront of regulatory initiatives. Honda (via its Belgian subsidiary), Toyota (through its French presence), Egret (Germany), L-Trott (France) and Trikke (Netherlands) have properly understood this and are actively involved in the work. Representatives of public authorities (including the DGCCRF for France – Directorate General for Competition Policy, Consumer Affairs and Fraud Control) and consumers (ANEC) are also present. “These entities have very high safety requirements,” adds Emmanuel Husson.

Product safety and usage conditions

The future European standard will cover light electric vehicles without seats and self-balancing vehicles, with or without seats, intended primarily for the transportation of one person in the urban environment. This standard excludes applications coming under the health field (covered by EN ISO 13482).

A technical part will propose methods for testing the vehicle’s mechanical and electrical components. Tests on brakes, tires, battery, handlebar, the robustness of the footrest, etc. All aspects of the vehicle will be covered to ensure a minimum safety level and limit main hazards.

In and excluded

Regarding the use, the voluntary standard will exclude vehicles having a maximum speed of 25 km/h. Included are machines designed to be used in public as well as private spaces, for instance in airports, libraries or large organizations, etc. In public spaces, they are already permitted on cycle tracks and sidewalks at a maximum speed of 6 km/h. “Due to the permitted tolerance, members of the working group have anticipated a possible future regulation with the addition of a specific button to switch to pedestrian mode,” mentions Emmanuel Husson. He continues: “The vast majority of manufacturers already offer a speed regulation system that could be useful if future legislation imposes a speed limit to be respected.”

The future voluntary standard will be proposed in a public inquiry in the first quarter of 2016, prior to publication in the course of the year.

Source: Bike-eu.com

 

More information:

European Committee for Standardization 

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How hard is it to ride an Electric Unicycle?

Most people find it quite difficult to get their head around the mechanics of an electric unicycle. The forward-backward movement is not much of a problem, because the unicycle’s gyroscopes and sensors look after that extremely well and after using the stabilizers/learning wheels for a very short time, most people have absolutely no problem with it.

The big problem, though, is to learn to master the sideways balancing, because that is completely left to you and the unicycle will not help you with it. There has been another time in most people’s life when you had to learn the sideways balancing, but that was a loooong time ago when your body was learning faster and you were less afraid of falling: Learning to ride an electric unicycle is like learning to ride a bicycle again! But the good news is that you managed once before, so you will manage it again! Give yourself some time and check out the learning resources are providing in another section of this website and trust your abilities! It is definitely worth it!

Everybody who has normal balance and normal use of legs and arms can learn it and a generalized rule could be: If you can cycle a bicycle, you can also ride a unicycle.

The good thing about human beings is that everybody is a little different and everybody has some strengths and some weaknesses. That also means that there are fast learners and others need a bit more time. We also run classes for people that want to learn it and we have seen huge differences. Some people learn the basics within 5-10 minutes, other need days or even weeks. Be consistent and keep working on it, but also leave breaks! Our brain sometimes needs a little extra time to build new connections in the brain.

Like you mastered cycling, you will also eventually master riding an electric unicycle and once you can do it, you will never forget it again.

Do you want to try? Join us in our open training and testing days.

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Electric Unicycle Terminology

 
 

EUC” (for Electric UniCycle)

 

The usual term used for the electric unicycles has usually been an “EUC” (for Electric UniCycle) More informally refer to them as “wheels”.

EUC Riding

Idling

Idling is the term for staying pretty much in place by moving the EUC back and forth. This is taxing for the motor (constantly changing direction) and eats up your battery fast, but can be useful for example to wait for a traffic light to change or such.

Leaning

 Leaning refers to using your body to move your center of gravity and control the EUC. You lean forwards and backwards to accelerate/decelerate or change direction. To turn the EUC, you usually lean to the direction you want to turn to (left or right), although you can also use your hips to “swivel” around for tight in-place turns.

Out-lean

Out-lean is a term used to refer to a situation where the rider leans (usually) forwards so much that the wheel cannot keep him/her balanced anymore, and usually ends up with the rider dismounting (or falling). Out-leaning usually occurs in uphills, where the wheel motor cannot keep producing enough torque to keep the wheel upright as the rider keeps leaning forward. Usually it occurs only after the full tilt-back, so most people shouldn’t be able to do it accidentally, unless it’s due to low battery (if the tilt-back is based on speed).

Overpower

Overpowering a wheel refers to similar situation as with out-lean, but seems to be more commonly used to describe a situation where the wheel cannot keep you balanced on level ground, for example when hitting a pothole that causes the wheel to tilt too much to forward or simply out-leaning.

Overspeed

 “Overspeed” is the speed where the mainboard cuts the power to the motor. I’m not certain why the cut-off occurs, but suspect that it would either require too much current to accelerate the motor faster (risking of burning components or voltage dropping too much) or the motor is very near it’s maximum rpm (where the torque drops so much that it cannot keep balancing the rider anymore). Some people suggest that the motor should never cut-off and instead let the pedals tilt forward once the motor cannot run any faster, leaving the rider at least a chance to try to recover, as shutting down the motor surely leads to a fall.

Power braking

This is a type of braking where you push the wheel in front of you with your legs while simultaneously leaning back and pushing the pedals down to brake as fast as possible. Requires some practice, but not that difficult, and a useful skill when you need to stop “on a dime”.

Tilt-back

Tilt-back is a safety measure, where the wheel starts to tilt the pedals backwards at higher speeds to warn and prevent the rider from leaning more forwards. While it is possible to lean more and try to get more speed, it might not be wise, as you can trigger a mainboard induced cut-off due to overspeed. Most wheels have this (some let the user adjust the tilt-back speeds with app), but some don’t have it at all.
 

The always recommend source: forum.electricunicycle.org/

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Inmotion V3, The twin wheeled electric unicycle

InMotion V3 stands out from any other electric wheel simply because the learning process is much shorter and for most of the beginners will take just a couple of tries. Thick leather side panels make InMotion V3 one of the most comfortable wheels for both learners and advanced riders. It should also be noted that most people complain about quite painful learning on some of the other models currently available on the market, whereas InMotion V3 very well differentiates itself from this crowd.

The quality is unbelievable , sleek, with great features including a suit case style handle to wheel it along and not carry, and also on board speaker (V3) that are quite good sounding. It also speaks to you, says hello when turning on, warns you of over speeding, among other things. The voice is very clear.

Inmotion-v3c-handle-PET

Has a front and back light, which alternate in colour, so the front is white, but for backwards it turns red. The ride is somewhat different to a single wheel, sloping surfaces does require a differ approach to ride on, but you soon get to grips with it. Loads of power, and a silky smooth ride with little sound.

InMotion V3 promises to cover a distance of up to 14 kilometres on a single charge with the top speed reaching 18 kph. At a moderate pace a rider of 85 kg can manage to use it for up to 3 hours.

On an even surface InMotion V3 performs quite well, it is smooth, powerful and safe. Maneuverability is reduced because of the twin wheel design, however it is not that much of an issue as riders can compensate by having more stability when it comes to turning at slow speed.

inmotion-v3c-electric-unicycle (1)

All in all the is a classy wheel and very simple to ride. Anyone who’s trying to learn to ride electric unicycles should look at buying one of these. Pro users can even perform tricks and jumps which is quite unusual for a dual wheel model. It is quite impressive, we must say we applaud SCV for InMotion V3 and cannot wait for company’s next products to come out.

inmotion unicycle test ride

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Hoverboards and Scooters on UK streets

 

Is it legal or illegal using an electric light vehicle?

 

The rules of the road or the err… pavement.

You’ve probably seen online videos of people using electric scooters and electric monowheels. You might’ve already seen people zipping past you on the streets with them. As ‘self-balancing’ electric unicycles and electric scooters become more common across the UK, more people are starting to realize how much they can change their transport experience. Whether it’s commuting to work or simply riding around for pleasure, it’s amazing to discover how far these vehicles can take you. But what is the legality of riding them in public places? Here we have some handy facts to keep you on the right side of the law.

 

Where can I ride an electric scooter?

Unfortunately, it is not a regulation on where to ride electric scooters in the UK. Because they are motorized, are considered motorized vehicles by the Department for Transport and subject to road traffic laws. Oddly enough, electric bicycles, which are also powered, are waived from these requirements and are legal to ride under their own rules. The laws dealing with new electric motorized vehicles are woefully out of date. These new vehicles are green, make wonderful substitutes for bicycles and can reduce congestion in crowded cities. Personally, when using my e-scooter in London, I cut my commute time by a half and was able to operate the scooter safely in the bicycle lanes without any issue but let’s see

Under the Road Vehicles (Construction & Use) Regulations 1986, the Department of Transport considers these electric scooters to be motor vehicles even though they travel at less than 18mph. These vehicles need to obtain registration and comply with basic safety standards. Most two-wheeled vehicles that travel faster than 4mph have to comply with the European Community Whole Vehicle Type Approval (ECWVTA), which came into operation on 17 June 1999. The European Union does not understand how to classify these new personal electric vehicles. Member countries can pass their own specific legislation to handle them but the United Kingdom has refused to do so.

The Vehicle Excise and Registration Act 1994 (VERA) states that every mechanically propelled vehicle used or kept on a public road should be registered and licensed. Because electric scooters do not meet the relevant requirements for use on UK roads they cannot be registered and licensed for use on a public road in the United Kingdom. As a consequence, any user of such a vehicle on a public road is likely at the very least to be committing the offenses of using the vehicle without insurance and using the vehicle without an excise license.

 

So What should I do?

Even when it is a relaxation enforcing the law is important to keep in mind everything from above. From our side, as a reseller, distributor, and enthusiast specialized in Light Electric Vehicles (LEVs), we make sure all vehicles sold by us are CE Compliance and comply with basic safety standards required to date. We have a lot of feedback from our clients and from own personal experiences commuting around, the best advice is the Common Sense Rule and here are few tips just in case:

  • Riding on pavement or crowded areas use your foot to kick.
  • Wear a helmet, high-visibility vest and use a bell (electric vehicles are pretty quiet so make sure people can see you)
  • Limit the speed of your scooter to 15.5mph on urban areas. (Check your manual on how to or contact us)
  • Cycle routes are the best place to ride. You are not a motorbike even if you feel like one
  • Respect road signs, rules, and other road users.
  • Smile and enjoy!

 Make you commute the best moment of your day.

 

The future is bright. The age of urban transport is upon us. So hop on and enjoy!

 

More information:

New European Standard

European Committee for Standardization